Brightpearl API: Add UPS Tracking Numbers

We have now been using our web store for about a month, and for the most part things have been going pretty smoothly. One issue has been sending orders to our warehouse, and we’ve got a pretty good Powershell script that creates a comma delimited text file (.csv) of order numbers and address information from queries to the Brightpearl API. This file is sent daily to the warehouse via FTP, and warehouse staff  import the orders into their UPS Worldship program.

Screenshot_042715_044611_PM

The second half of this saga is to obtain the UPS Tracking number for each shipment. Once the shipment has been processed in UPS Worldship, a tracking number is generated and stored in the UPS Worldship record for that shipment. Worldship has an export function which will add the tracking number to a .csv file of order numbers and tracking numbers that we can use to update the order record in Brightpearl. The structure of this file, (which is completely customizable) is:

Order Number – In our case it is the Brightpearl sales order number
Tracking Number – from UPS. These look like “1Z 041 388 03 8331 4101”
Expected Delivery Date.
The .csv file looks like this. (UPS loves long field names).

ShipToCustomerID,ShipmentInformationLeadTrackingNumber,ShipmentInformationDeliveryDateTransitTime
"100064","1Z0413880373533722","20150429"
"100020","1Z0413880373302132","20150504"
"100068","1Z0413880373810940","20150430"
"100074","1Z0413880374436157","20150430"

The next step is to walk through the .csv file, find an order number, and update the custom field PCF_TRACKING in Brightpearl to contain the tracking number. Here is the Powershell call to update a single record:

PS>$BPOrders=Invoke-RestMethod `
 -Uri http://ws-use.brightpearl.com/public-api/myBPAccount/order-service/order/100541/custom-field `
 -Body $body `
 -Headers $headers `
 -Method Patch

There are a couple points of interest here. For the most part it is “standard” Powershell syntax for the Invoke-RestMethod.
1. We invoke this by assigning the results of the API call to $BPOrders
2. The call has several lines; the line continuation character is a accent aigu or back-tick.
3. Note that this query uses a $headers variable which includes the two validation properties for the Brightpearl query: , the name of the application and the security token for the application. These are stored as a hashtable.

PS>$headers
brightpearl-app-ref myappreference
brightpearl-staff-token mystaff-tokenXYZ123

More on obtaining the authcode here.

4. The $body variable is also created as a hashtable, but then converted to JSON, and placed between square brackets. This variable contains three parameters, the operation that you are performing on the record, the field that you want to modify, and the value that you want to put in the field. The syntax below simply says, “Replace the contents of the /PCF_TRACKING field with the value of 12345”.

$body=[ordered]@{"op"="replace";"path"="/PCF_TRACKING";"value"="12345"}
$body=($body | ConvertTo-JSON)
$body=("["+$body+"]")

The result is:

PS>$body
[{
"op": "replace",
"path": "/PCF_TRACKING",
"value": "12345"
}]

5. The -Method parameter is a “Patch”. This allows you to replace the contents of a single field in a record rather than replace an entire record as happens when you use PUT.

6. Finally note in the Invoke-RestMethod call, the URI contains “custom-field”. This is a literal, it isn’t the name of your custom field. The name of the custom field is contained in the body.I In the example above, it is “/PCF_TRACKING”

The above API call will replace the contents of a single field in a single record. The next step is to be able to loop through the .csv file, and for each record, find the corresponding record within the Brightpearl database, and update its Tracking number field.

Oh, one more thing, the results of the operation are contained in $BPOrders. The API actually returns the contents of ALL custom fields. You can choose which ones you want to see using dot notation.


PS>$BPOrders.response.PCF_TRACKING
12345

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s